For the more information about the geologic resources of the National Park Service, please visit http://www.nature.nps.gov/geology/.


Geological Monitoring

Overview

Geological monitoring involves taking repeated measurements in order to detect long term change. Monitoring data can be used to help land managers assess whether changes in a geologic resource are within a normal range of variation, or if the observed changes dictate a corrective action in management practices.


Geological Monitoring Book

The Geologic Resources Division of the National Park Service initiated and funded the development of a geologic monitoring manual to provide guidance for resource managers seeking to establish the status and trends of geologic resources within the National Park System, and to further the understanding of how geologic processes impact dynamic ecosystems.

In the section below you will be able to explore the 12 critical geologic resources discussed in the manual. On each page you will find a description of the resource, justification for long-term monitoring, a list of vital signs that may be monitored, as well as other useful resources and a link to the chapter from the monitoring manual.

Chapters

Aeolian

Aeolian Learn more »

Caves & Karst

Caves & Karst Learn more »

Coastal

Coastal Learn more »

Fluvial

Fluvial Learn more »

Geothermal

Geothermal Learn more »

Glaciers

Glaciers Learn more »

Marine

Marine Learn more »

Paleontology

Paleontology Learn more »

Permafrost

Permafrost Learn more »

Seismic Activity

Seismic Activity Learn more »

Slope Movements

Slope Movements Learn more »

Volcanoes

Volcanoes Learn more »


Related Links

 

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Last Updated: March 06, 2012